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Arizona Criminal Law

When Does Possession of Marijuana Become Intent to Sell?

Possession of Marijuana Intent to Sell

Conviction of possession of marijuana or intent to sell charges lead to serious punishment in Arizona. Under state law, “marijuana” refers to any or all parts of the cannabis plant from which the resin has not been extracted. The plant may be growing, dead, or just in the form of unsterilized seeds capable of germination. Police and prosecutors work closely together to ensure as many convictions as possible are delivered on cases of possession or sale of these plants, with felony convictions resulting in jail time, prison, expensive fines and other penalties.


When Marijuana Possession Becomes Intent to Sell

Arizona Revised Statute, ARS 13-3405 states, “A person shall not knowingly possess or use marijuana” or “possess marijuana for sale.” But what makes possession of marijuana “intent to sell?” The statute defines possession of marijuana for sale as meeting three standards beyond a reasonable doubt:

  • You knowingly possessed marijuana
  • The substance is confirmed as marijuana
  • The possession is for the purpose of sale

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What Are the Differences Between Jail and Prison in Arizona?

Jail vs Prison in Arizona

Many people use the terms “jail” and “prison” synonymously. But these two types of facilities have some distinct differences, as much as they have much in common.

When you are facing charges that may lead to prison time, or when you are put in jail for an offense, having the right lawyer on your side can mean the difference between staying locked up or gaining your freedom. At this critical time, you need an experienced criminal lawyer, such as the attorneys at the Law Offices of David Michael Cantor in Phoenix, Arizona.


Jails of Arizona

Jails are managed by local jurisdictions, cities and counties. These facilities are where people are held for the short term, usually while awaiting a hearing, sentencing, bail to be paid or other court process. When someone is suspected of committing a crime, he or she will be held in a jail as a detainee. Some occupants of city and county jails have been convicted of their crimes and serve a short sentence in the jail instead of being sent to a prison. (more…)

What are the Types of Arizona Felony Classes

Types of Arizona Felony Classes

Felony Class Types in Arizona

There are six levels of felony classes in Arizona. Each class has its own guidelines for punishment if convicted. When looking at sentencing, the law presumes that everyone will start at the presumptive sentence however, this sentence can be increased or decreased if mitigating or aggravating factors are found by the Judge or jury. The following sentencing ranges apply to a person with no prior felony convictions.

  • Class 1 – The only crime that falls under a Class 1 felony is murder. Murder charges are divided into two categories: First or Second Degree. First degree murder is punishable by the death penalty or by life in prison without parole. Second degree murder requires a minimum prison sentence of 10 years up to a maximum sentence of 25 years.
  • Class 2 – A Class 2 felony allows for a minimum sentence in the Department of Corrections of three years. This can be increased to up to 12.5 years for aggravated. Probation, with up to one year in jail, is also available.
  • Class 3 – Class 3 felonies allows for a minimum of two years in prison with an aggravated sentence of up to 8.75 years. Probation is also available.
  • Class 4– If sentenced to prison on a Class 4 felony, you face anywhere between 1 to 3.75 years. Again, probation is available.
  • Class 5 – A Class 5 felony provides for a minimum of six months in prison however, can be increased to up to 2.5 years. Probation is available.
  • Class 6 – Although a Class 6 felony, an example could be a DUI in Phoenix, also allows for a probation sentence, if sentenced to prison the range allows for anywhere between .33 – 2 years.

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New Evidence Leads to Dismissal of Child Sex Abuse Charges

With trial scheduled to begin only nine days later, charges of child sex abuse against Robert Koenig, 63, were dismissed at the prosecution’s request, motivated by the discovery of new evidence following Mr. Koenig’s indictment some six months earlier.

Mr. Koenig faced two counts of gross sexual imposition and one count of rape under that indictment. Those charges stemmed from Koenig’s role as a foster parent, a role he and his wife had shared for five years by the time Mr. Koenig was first charged.

When it learned of the abuse allegations, the official licensing agency, Lucas County Children Services, began the process of removing the Koenigs from the foster care program. The Koenigs, however, withdrew voluntarily before that removal process was completed.

Robert Koenig - Public PhotoMr. Koenig had been a teacher for the Toledo Public Schools from 1975 to 2010, spending most of his career in middle schools. He worked as a substitute teacher in that school system for three years until his retirement in 2013.

According to Frank Spryszak, the assistant county prosecutor who sought the dismissal, his action was driven by the discovery of new evidence “that put us in a position that we no longer felt that we had sufficient evidence to proceed to trial.”

Lorin Zaner, the attorney defending Mr. Koenig, describes himself as a leading child sexual conduct with a minor lawyer with a particular interest in false abuse allegations. He said that the dismissal came as a great relief to his client. “We had the documentation to show that there’s no way our guy could’ve done what they said,” he said.

At the same time, he called attention to the negative consequences of the allegations for Mr. and Mrs. Koenig, a state of affairs that may be familiar to him as a sex crimes lawyer. “They truly had a desire to help children. To be in a position of being falsely accused because you put yourself out there to help children is a tragedy because these are good people. Their names are drug through the mud. Why do you want to put yourself in that position? It’s terrible.”

Mr. Koenig had pleaded not guilty to the charges, and he had been released on $300,000 bond after appearing before Court of Common Pleas Judge Ruth Ann Franks, the same judge who later heard the prosecution’s request to dismiss all charges.

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Man arrested second time for stabbing stranger in Phoenix

PHOENIX – 27-year-old Christopher Gale was arrested on Sunday for a second time on suspicion of aggravated assault and attempted first-degree murder. The incident took place at a Phoenix Walgreens store.

According to police reports, the crime actually occurred in September 2013 when Gale stabbed a stranger using an eight-inch knife he had bought from a Walmart store just a few hours before the stabbing. He went to a Walgreens store about four miles away from the Walmart store, approached a woman who was shopping and stabbed her in the neck from behind. The woman started screaming and an armed off-duty federal agent, who happened to be in the store, ran over from the checkout line where he was standing and pulled the weapon away from the woman and ordered Gale to get on the ground and put the knife down.

Gale was arrested for a previous crime but was found incompetent to stand trial for the charges he was facing. The charges against Gale were dismissed in May 2013 by a court commissioner and he was ordered to receive treatment at a psychiatric facility which he did. After his release from Desert Vista Behavior Health, a mental health facility in Mesa, Gale was subsequently arrested for the stabbing. According to the court documents, when Gale stabbed the woman at the Walmart store, she turned around to face her attacker who told her, “I’m killing you to save the world.”

The woman suffered a puncture wound which needed several staples. She was able to push away her attacker.

Gale later told the police that he bought the eight-inch knife to “stab and kill” someone.

According to Jerry Cobb, a spokesman for the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office, it is not yet decided if any charges will be filed again against Gale.

Gale had a run-in with the law in 2012 also when he was arrested on the suspicion of indecent exposure and drug-related offenses. He pled guilty to the reduced charges in that case.

Gale appeared in Maricopa County Superior Court on Friday for an initial appearance and is being held on $1 million bond on charges of attempted first-degree murder and aggravated assault. His lawyer , Roger Margolis, did not immediately return a call Friday for comment. The attorney was appointed on the orders of a commissioner to represent Gale in court.

Online court records did not describe the alleged crimes which Gale is facing. However, the commissioner who ordered Gale to undergo psychiatric treatment said in a May 29 order that Gale was a danger to others as well as to himself. He also said that he is unable to understand the nature of proceedings against him and needed assistance in his defense.

 

Author Bio:

Law Office Of Mark Rosenfeld provides strong and aggressive legal representation for DUI Cases in Beverly Hills, California.

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